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2012 Business

a message from their sponsors

No telly so haven't seen it, but on Twitter @jennifermjones was rather caustic about Tier 1 sponsor BP's new Olympics greenwashing ad:

Oh my god. Just saw the London2012/BP advert. It is a f***ing oil company talking about blatantly greening a mega event.

As @PlatformLondon point out, BP do culture-washing too. The newly launched UK edition of HuffPo has a review, Hunt's Glass Slipper is Filling with Toxic Toes. As the title suggests it's not exactly flattering about the new Tessa, Jeremy *unt either.

But Reverend Billy is coming to cleanse them. And there was some guerilla ballet in Trafalgar Square too: BP White Swan

BP White Swan from You and I Films.


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JAC Travel tells hoteliers to jack in Locog

BoJo's apology does not seem to have stemmed the revolt among London's hoteliers and travel operators. JAC Travel, the UK’s largest inbound tour operator, is now encouraging hoteliers to break with Locog.


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The true cost of tickets for the Olympics: community and workplace organising?

from Corporate Watch

Official prestige tickets for the 2012 Olympics, which include food and drink, are going to be some of the most expensive in the history of sport, at £4,500 per person.

These tickets cannot be sold as single tickets, but only in blocks of ten. In addition, conditions of purchase will mean that an individual or company buying hospitality tickets for the opening or closing ceremonies of the Games will have to pay a minimum of £270,000, because seats for other events much also be bought at the same time. The only sports tickets to ever be more expensive were those for the 2011 Super Bowl in Texas at £5,545 each. However, once tax is added, the Olympics tickets become £5,400, so together with the ‘minimum buy’ requirements the tickets are not far off the most expensive sports tickets in history.


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Property companies eye Olympic profits

The Property world is getting excited by the interest supposedly being showed in the Athletes’ Village and the Media Centre. Of course, expressions of interest are not the same as money on the table. But even if the money does materialise what does this signify? That property tycoons see an opportunity to make a profit? And that profit will be made at a loss to the public purse of at least £150million on the Village and an unknown sum on the Media Centre.


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Arrests at the Dorchester?

The Telegraph has suggested the 2012 Olympics will provide a key test for the new Bribery Act. Corporate hospitality is supposed to come under scrutiny. Really? The whole point about this kind of event is the bidding war which requires nations to chuck goodies at international sports bodies. Freebies are what the IOC and others expect while sponsors and businesses have always used tickets to arts and sports events as a way to make friends and influence people.


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Research Paper: Small Business Communities and the London Olympics 2012

Research paper into the experiences of small businesses forced to move to make way for the 2012 London Olympic Games.


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Cheesy Wotsits

That recent bit of bad publicity about the North/south divide - South gets Olympic contracts seems to have got the spin merchants exercised again.


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North/south divide - South gets Olympic contracts

In 2005, when London won the 2012 Olympics, Seb Coe of Locog Ltd wrote "The London 2012 Games will provide a unique opportunity for businesses of all shapes and sizes across the UK, providing essential goods and services for this historic event." Unsurprisingly, as with most Olympic promises, the reality has turned out to be somewhat different.


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