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Olympics Studies

AdiZones: Rewriting the 2012 Olympic Legacy as Permanent Branding

By Alberto Duman

Right from the outset, the notion of “legacy” has been predominant in articulating the value of hosting the 2012 Olympic and Paralympics Games in East London, the argument being that the long-term regeneration benefits would ultimately prevail over the aggressive land restructuring, everyday disruption and unbalanced socio-economic shifts characteristic of the years leading up to the 2012 Games. Subsequent to the awarding of the 2012 Games, the emphasis placed on such explicit non-sporting benefits as added long-term values has been confirmed as one of the most decisive assets of the London bid, contributing a great deal to the final awarding decision by the IOC.[1] This legacy, we are told, is why the London 2012 Games will be “unique” and “different”, a pledge clearly spelled out through “five promises to set the scale of our ambition”:

  1. To make the UK a world-leading sporting nation
  2. To transform the heart of East London
  3. To inspire a generation of young people
  4. To make the Olympic Park a blueprint for sustainable living
  5. To demonstrate the UK is a creative, inclusive and welcoming
    place to live in, visit and for business.[2]

Although the national dimension of these ambitions is clearly emphasised, a more specific focus is placed on “transforming the heart of East London”, to “create a well-planned and well-managed environment in and around the Olympic Park which will attract business investment and promote recreational and cultural use for years to come”.[3]


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adiZones and Lo-Lifes

by @spitzenprodukte


GAMIFY INSURRECTION


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Olympic State of Exception

Surveillance mast: photo copyright Giles Price, from The Art of Dissentphoto copyright Giles Price, from The Art of Dissent
by Isaac Marrero-Guillamón

Every other year the Olympic machine lands at a different city, where it nonetheless encounters a familiar scenario: by the night of the opening ceremony all the necessary infrastructures will have been built, free of charge, by the host; all of the city’s advertising space will have been occupied by the official sponsors of the event; state of the art security and military measures will have been deployed to protect the event; high-speed lanes connecting the venues with certain hotels will have been made exclusively available to the convenience of the members of the International Olympic Committee (IOC); and, if everything has gone according to plan, tickets will be long gone and an army of eager volunteers will be at the disposal of the organisers.


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An introduction to the social impacts of the Olympics

The Olympics project is large and complex. In this revised version of our previous paper of the same name, we draw your attention to significant impacts, the paucity of procedures for impact evaluation, and the processes surrounding the bidding for, and promotion of, the Olympic event.


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Under the radar: Fat activism and the London 2012 Olympics

An interview with Charlotte Cooper

The fat body has moved from relative invisibility to object of moral panic in the space of the last 15 years. To be fat now is to be regarded as socially deviant, branded with the stigma of poverty, a ‘faulty consumer’ within the paradigms of late capitalism. Images of fatness cluster with the refusal of work in policy scenarios. Schools have become sensitised to the body weight of their pupils, health educators articulate a normative crisis in national eating habits. In the run-up to London 2012 ‘the body’ objectified was placed centre stage.


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The Olympic Fringe: A postgraduate study

I have just stumbled across this document published by the LSE Cities Programme

In "2009-10 the focus was on the areas surrounding East London's massive Olympic Park development: Hackney Wick, Fish Island, Sugarhouse Lane, Carpenter's Estate, Stratford Town Centre and Leyton. How will they benefit from the regeneration projects promised for this largely deprived part of London? Students suggested some interventions, emphasising the role small, local projects could play in the growth and change of the Olympic fringe sites.


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no olympic truce

(Of course the Olympics aren't political.) That 'Olympic Truce' that was only re-invented in 1996 for the Athens Olympics, errm, for the Olympic Flame Relay actually.


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Occupying the Olympics?

Occupying the Olympics: What can be done? (From @tentcityuni) #occupy2012

by Jennifer Jones
November 21st, 2011 | Published in #Media2012 and the Olympic Games, Activism, Citizen Media, Featured, London2012


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