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The true cost of tickets for the Olympics: community and workplace organising?

from Corporate Watch

Official prestige tickets for the 2012 Olympics, which include food and drink, are going to be some of the most expensive in the history of sport, at £4,500 per person.

These tickets cannot be sold as single tickets, but only in blocks of ten. In addition, conditions of purchase will mean that an individual or company buying hospitality tickets for the opening or closing ceremonies of the Games will have to pay a minimum of £270,000, because seats for other events much also be bought at the same time. The only sports tickets to ever be more expensive were those for the 2011 Super Bowl in Texas at £5,545 each. However, once tax is added, the Olympics tickets become £5,400, so together with the ‘minimum buy’ requirements the tickets are not far off the most expensive sports tickets in history.


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WikiLeaks Cables Anticipate Human Rights Violations in Lead-Up to Rio Olympics

by Bob Quellos

The ever-increasing trove of US diplomatic cables released by WikiLeaks is shedding light on the realities the people of Rio de Janeiro will be facing as that city prepares to host the 2016 Summer Olympic Games. The released cables focus mainly on Rio de Janeiro's Orwellian-named "Favela Pacification Program," run by Rio's Peacemaker Police Units known as UPP, and discuss the possibility of human rights violations in the run-up to the 2016 Olympics.


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The Olympics, Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility

Podium Conference 2011: Panel at the Podium Conference Countdown to the Games February 2011.  Copyright ©2011 sytaffelPodium Conference 2011: Copyright ©2011 sytaffel


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Going for Gold: Globalizing the Olympics, Localizing the Games. J. R. Short

This paper discusses the siting of the Summer Olympic Games at the global, national and local scales. The increasing corporatization of the Games is examined. Their use in city marketing campaigns is evaluated.


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Getting a leg(acy) up

by Stuart Fuller

Here is a little secret for West Ham United and Tottenham Hotspur awaiting the decision on who will get the Olympic Stadium next week. Whisper it quietly, but football fans rarely want to watch football in an Olympic Stadium. Why do I say that? Well a simple look at similar structures around the world, built for non-football events reveals quite a bit. The prospect of an Olympic Games being awarded to a city sends them into construction meltdown, over promising and in most cases under delivering on the legacy of the games. The whole story of whether a stadium will have an athletics track or not is not a new thing. We all know that at the end of the day politics will win the day, and we have seen all sorts of stories in the past few weeks about who will do what when/if they win the bid.


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that Pudding Mill White Elephant

The saga of the Stadium's non-legacy rumbles on.

Ken has waded in claiming waste of public money and horrendous environmental consequences should Tottenham succeed with their bid entailing the demolition of the currently under-construction stadium and it's replacement with something more suitable to the needs of Premiership football. So it appears poor old West Ham are still highly likely to be saddled with that "fundamentally flawed" Olympic Stadium according to coverage by Paul Norman and Amanda Baillieu in Building Design.


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Arrests at the Dorchester?

The Telegraph has suggested the 2012 Olympics will provide a key test for the new Bribery Act. Corporate hospitality is supposed to come under scrutiny. Really? The whole point about this kind of event is the bidding war which requires nations to chuck goodies at international sports bodies. Freebies are what the IOC and others expect while sponsors and businesses have always used tickets to arts and sports events as a way to make friends and influence people.


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